"I’m not insane about Brando for this. In fact, in my opinion he is quite wrong. But he’s a fine actor and if he’s really excited about it and will work like a beginner trying to get a start, he can be fine. He’s got to be hungry and anxious. The power to be that disappears with your picture on an ad.” - Elia Kazan’s letter to Bud Schulberg concerning the casting of Terry in “On The Waterfront
Marlon Brando photographed at the 27th Academy Awards holding his Oscar he won for his role as Terry Malloy in On The Waterfront

"I’m not insane about Brando for this. In fact, in my opinion he is quite wrong. But he’s a fine actor and if he’s really excited about it and will work like a beginner trying to get a start, he can be fine. He’s got to be hungry and anxious. The power to be that disappears with your picture on an ad.” - Elia Kazan’s letter to Bud Schulberg concerning the casting of Terry in “On The Waterfront

Marlon Brando photographed at the 27th Academy Awards holding his Oscar he won for his role as Terry Malloy in On The Waterfront


Marlon Brando in a studio publicity shot c. 1960s

Marlon Brando in a studio publicity shot c. 1960s

Francis Ford Coppola with Al Pacino and Marlon Brando behind the scenes of The Godfather (1972)

There was screen acting before Brando and after Brando, just as there was painting before Picasso and after Picasso…and even the casual observer can tell the difference. As film historian Molly Haskell pointed out, the film star’s legend “is written in one word. BRANDO. Like Garbo. Like Fido. An animal, a force of nature, an element; not a human being who must, as a member of society, distinguish himself from other members with a Christian name and an initial as well as a surname. There is only one Brando.” — Stefan Kanfer

There was screen acting before Brando and after Brando, just as there was painting before Picasso and after Picasso…and even the casual observer can tell the difference. As film historian Molly Haskell pointed out, the film star’s legend “is written in one word. BRANDO. Like Garbo. Like Fido. An animal, a force of nature, an element; not a human being who must, as a member of society, distinguish himself from other members with a Christian name and an initial as well as a surname. There is only one Brando.” — Stefan Kanfer

But the fact is, making movies is time out for me because the rest, the nearly complete whole, is what’s real for me. I’m not an actor and haven’t been for years. I’m a human being — hopefully a concerned and somewhat intelligent one — who occasionally acts.

But the fact is, making movies is time out for me because the rest, the nearly complete whole, is what’s real for me. I’m not an actor and haven’t been for years. I’m a human being — hopefully a concerned and somewhat intelligent one — who occasionally acts.

Marlon Brando didn’t win the Academy Award in 1951 for his acting in “A Streetcar Named Desire.” The Oscar went to Humphrey Bogart, for “The African Queen.” But you could make a good case that no performance had more influence on modern film acting styles than Brando’s work as Stanley Kowalski, Tennessee Williams’ rough, smelly, sexually charged hero. 
Before this role, there was usually a certain restraint in American movie performances. Actors would portray violent emotions, but you could always sense to some degree a certain modesty that prevented them from displaying their feelings in raw nakedness. 
Brando held nothing back, and within a few years his was the style that dominated Hollywood movie acting. — Roger Ebert 

Marlon Brando didn’t win the Academy Award in 1951 for his acting in “A Streetcar Named Desire.” The Oscar went to Humphrey Bogart, for “The African Queen.” But you could make a good case that no performance had more influence on modern film acting styles than Brando’s work as Stanley Kowalski, Tennessee Williams’ rough, smelly, sexually charged hero.

Before this role, there was usually a certain restraint in American movie performances. Actors would portray violent emotions, but you could always sense to some degree a certain modesty that prevented them from displaying their feelings in raw nakedness.

Brando held nothing back, and within a few years his was the style that dominated Hollywood movie acting. — Roger Ebert 

George Bernard Shaw said that thinking was the greatest of all human endeavours, but I would say that feeling was. Allowing yourself to feel things, to feel love or wrath, hatred, rage.

George Bernard Shaw said that thinking was the greatest of all human endeavours, but I would say that feeling was. Allowing yourself to feel things, to feel love or wrath, hatred, rage.

tedbunny:

Photographer Mary Ellen Mark and Marlon Brando on the “Apocalypse Now” set, Pagsanjan, Philippines, 1976 by Stefani Kong Uhler. 

tedbunny:

Photographer Mary Ellen Mark and Marlon Brando on the “Apocalypse Now” set, Pagsanjan, Philippines, 1976 by Stefani Kong Uhler. 

onlybrando:

Marlon Brando with crew members on the set of “On The Waterfront” Circa 1954.

onlybrando:

  • Marlon Brando with crew members on the set of “On The Waterfront” Circa 1954.
“He was like a big kid, too. I’ve met a few geniuses in my time and Marlon Brando was one of them. And not necessarily because he was such a wonderful actor, but just because of what he thought about, what he talked about and what he was interested in. Aside from that, he was like a big kid, he was irresponsible, although he was also very good, like a gifted child.”
— Francis Ford Coppola (x)